‘Bromosexual’ is Officially a Thing: The New York Times Says So

Because we apparently need a term for every possible idea, ‘bromosexual’ is a word that has been catching on lately, so much so that even the New York Times devoted a large article in the Style section to the idea.  Bromosexual is a term to describe the friendship between a gay man and a straight man, or as most of us call it ‘a friendship’.

Firstly, I would like to go on record as saying that I hate the term.  Partly because every variation on the word ‘bro’ annoys me.  But also because of the emphasis on the ‘-sexual’ part, which really has nothing to do with what the word is trying to describe – a platonic friendship.

I shouldn’t be too critical since it’s meant to be a lighthearted piece, not a hard-hitting investigative article.  It talks about examples in pop culture, like Nick Jonas’s gay character on “Scream Queens”.  And it talks about John Mayer playing wingman to Andy Cohen and other similar bromances (also ugh).  And hey, maybe if some straight guys read it and realize that it’s socially acceptable to have gay friends, it’ll have some good effects.

But I was hardly the only one rubbed the wrong way.  Some in the blogosphere weren’t particularly kind, with headlines like “New York Times Just Now Discovering ‘Bromosexual’ Relationships” on Queerty and “Good News Guys! The New York Times Says It’s Okay for Gay Men to Have Straight Male Friends!” on Metro.co.uk.

I guess I’ve been a little spoiled in this area, with good straight friends since I first came out.  With all the rejection and tension that came with coming out, my straight high school guy friends were some of the most accepting.  And I’ve had plenty of straight guy friends since then too.  Really I think sometimes I’m a little too quick to assume that people are cool with it.

So maybe that’s why I don’t feel like throwing a parade and devoting New York Times ink to the issue.  What do you guys think?  Is this breaking news in your personal world?  Comment below.

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